New Hampshire-01 debate features Chris Pappas, Karoline Leavitt


0

The candidates in New Hampshire’s 1st Congressional District met in a fiery debate Thursday, less than a week before voters head to the polls.Democratic incumbent U.S. Rep. Chris Pappas is seeking another term in Congress, but he’s facing a strong challenge from Republican Karoline Leavitt.>> 1st Congressional District candidates on the issuesThe two clashed on several issues in the Granite State Debate, sponsored by WMUR in partnership with the New Hampshire Institute of Politics. Leavitt, a former White House staffer in the Trump administration, sought to tie Pappas to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and President Joe Biden, while Pappas portrayed himself as being able to work across the aisle on solutions, describing Leavitt’s proposals as “reckless.”>> Read debate participant bios: Leavitt | PappasThere were several moments in the debate when the two candidates went back and forth, criticizing the other’s stance on abortion, immigration and government spending.The first question of the debate was on Social Security, an issue the two candidates have split on. Leavitt said she wants to protect Social Security for those who are receiving benefits and for those who are currently paying into the system.”However, I want to save Social Security for future generations of Americans, elementary-school-age Americans, my nephews, who are 8 and 2 years old,” Leavitt said. “The truth is, this program is not going to exist for them, so I want to look for sustainable retirement solutions, and all options are on the table.”Leavitt didn’t provide any specifics, but Pappas said her ideas to privatize Social Security are dangerous.”Now, Karoline Leavitt has a dangerous plan to privatize Social Security, to gamble it on the stock market,” Pappas said. “New Hampshire can’t afford a plan like that. She’s also supporting raising the retirement age.”RE-WATCH THE DEBATE:See the full debate at this link, or view the debate by segment here:IntroductionsSocial SecurityInflationHousing costsImmigrationAbortionChild careDebt ceilingSupport for veterans2020 election & future of FITN primaryCollege costs and debtLightning round: Conspiracy theories, future US house speakersUkraine aidEnergy costsGun lawsClimate changeDealing with adversity Closing statementsFull debate video >> Spin room post-debate reactions: Karoline Leavitt | Chris PappasPappas said he wants a bipartisan commission to look at ways to continue to support Social Security.When asked about policies related to the southern border, the two candidates offered strikingly similar solutions.”We should be investing more in resources to support our law enforcement along the southern border,” Pappas said. “I’ve done that — hundreds of millions of dollars for Customs and Border Patrol, as well as technology at border checkpoints.”Leavitt said the solution was also to get more resources to the southern border.”We need to invest in border security,” she said. “We need to invest in our United States Border Patrol, who are protecting us and who have been put through hell over the past two years to protect the lives of the people of this state.”The difference, Leavitt said, was that she believes the current administration and leaders in Congress haven’t done enough.>> See the full debate here:”This border crisis is having a direct toll on Granite Staters, and frankly, you have done nothing to solve it,” she said.Pappas said he has been pressuring the White House to do more.”We do have a crisis at the border, and I have stood up to the Biden administration and urged them to develop a plan,” he said. “I was one of the only voices in my party to challenge them on Title 42, because we have an unsafe situation on the border for migrants and a security situation for Americans.”The candidates also clashed on abortion, which became a top issue in 2022 after the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, triggering several abortion bans in states across the country. In New Hampshire, Gov. Chris Sununu earlier signed a ban on abortions after 24 weeks into law.The court decision left abortion laws up to individual states, a position that Leavitt said she supports. She was asked in the debate whether additional restrictions on abortion would put women’s lives at risk, with panelist Jean Mackin citing a peer-reviewed study that showed that a nationwide ban on abortion would lead to a 7% increase in pregnancy-related deaths the first year and a 21% increase thereafter.Leavitt refused to answer the question, instead saying that she doesn’t favor a federal ban on abortion and supports current New Hampshire law. Asked the question again, she restated her previous statements.Pappas was asked whether he supported a Department of Defense policy to pay for transportation costs for service members who needed to travel to another state for an elective abortion, and whether he supports expanding that to other government workers.Pappas said he supports giving servicemembers and veterans access to the health care that they need before pivoting to attack Leavitt’s position.”She supported the overturning of Roe v. Wade and said she would always be a pro-life vote in Congress. The folks in this state, the women of this state, deserve a pro-choice vote in Congress. That’s what I’ll be,” Pappas said. “Karoline Leavitt wants politicians to decide this issue for women. I want women and families in consultation with their doctors to decide it for themselves.”Leavitt replied that the issue of abortion in New Hampshire should be decided by New Hampshire lawmakers.”I support those closest to the people, closest to the voters in Concord, New Hampshire, to make decisions not just on this issue but, frankly, on every issue,” she said.Pappas then reiterated that he believes abortion decisions should be left to women and their doctors.”I think it’s really chilling that you stand up here tonight and you think that politicians in Concord should be determining this choice for women,” he said. Both candidates dodged a question related to gun rights, when Leavitt was asked whether weapons like AR-15s are needed to prevent government tyranny and Pappas was asked whether the purpose of the Second Amendment was to give Americans the right to defend themselves from the government.Neither addressed the specific question, but Leavitt said she supports the right of law-abiding citizens to buy guns. Pappas said people’s constitutional rights must be respected, but more must be done to address gun violence.Leavitt didn’t answer directly when asked whether she believes former President Donald Trump is telling the truth when says the 2020 election was stolen from him. “I have been very clear on my position on this issue,” Leavitt said. “I believe there were irregularities in the 2020 election. l talk to voters every single day who feel the same.”Pappas said Leavitt has continued to spread falsehoods about the 2020 election, none of which are supported by evidence.”She actually said she was proud to have ‘held the line’ on Jan. 6 by working for a member of Congress who voted to overturn the election results that night,” Pappas said. “That is just chilling. We know the folks who were holding the line that day, members of the Capitol police, five of whom lost their lives as a result of the insurrection at the Capitol because of the big lie, and you continue to tell it in your campaign, and that’s just shameful.”The final Granite State Debate of this political cycle will be held Friday night with the 2nd Congressional District candidates. The debates air each night at 8 p.m. live on WMUR-TV, WMUR.com and inside the WMUR app.

The candidates in New Hampshire’s 1st Congressional District met in a fiery debate Thursday, less than a week before voters head to the polls.

Democratic incumbent U.S. Rep. Chris Pappas is seeking another term in Congress, but he’s facing a strong challenge from Republican Karoline Leavitt.

>> 1st Congressional District candidates on the issues

The two clashed on several issues in the Granite State Debate, sponsored by WMUR in partnership with the New Hampshire Institute of Politics. Leavitt, a former White House staffer in the Trump administration, sought to tie Pappas to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and President Joe Biden, while Pappas portrayed himself as being able to work across the aisle on solutions, describing Leavitt’s proposals as “reckless.”

>> Read debate participant bios: Leavitt | Pappas

There were several moments in the debate when the two candidates went back and forth, criticizing the other’s stance on abortion, immigration and government spending.

The first question of the debate was on Social Security, an issue the two candidates have split on. Leavitt said she wants to protect Social Security for those who are receiving benefits and for those who are currently paying into the system.

“However, I want to save Social Security for future generations of Americans, elementary-school-age Americans, my nephews, who are 8 and 2 years old,” Leavitt said. “The truth is, this program is not going to exist for them, so I want to look for sustainable retirement solutions, and all options are on the table.”

Leavitt didn’t provide any specifics, but Pappas said her ideas to privatize Social Security are dangerous.

“Now, Karoline Leavitt has a dangerous plan to privatize Social Security, to gamble it on the stock market,” Pappas said. “New Hampshire can’t afford a plan like that. She’s also supporting raising the retirement age.”


RE-WATCH THE DEBATE:

See the full debate at this link, or view the debate by segment here:

>> Spin room post-debate reactions: Karoline Leavitt | Chris Pappas


Pappas said he wants a bipartisan commission to look at ways to continue to support Social Security.

When asked about policies related to the southern border, the two candidates offered strikingly similar solutions.

“We should be investing more in resources to support our law enforcement along the southern border,” Pappas said. “I’ve done that — hundreds of millions of dollars for Customs and Border Patrol, as well as technology at border checkpoints.”

Leavitt said the solution was also to get more resources to the southern border.

“We need to invest in border security,” she said. “We need to invest in our United States Border Patrol, who are protecting us and who have been put through hell over the past two years to protect the lives of the people of this state.”

The difference, Leavitt said, was that she believes the current administration and leaders in Congress haven’t done enough.

>> See the full debate here:

“This border crisis is having a direct toll on Granite Staters, and frankly, you have done nothing to solve it,” she said.

Pappas said he has been pressuring the White House to do more.

“We do have a crisis at the border, and I have stood up to the Biden administration and urged them to develop a plan,” he said. “I was one of the only voices in my party to challenge them on Title 42, because we have an unsafe situation on the border for migrants and a security situation for Americans.”

The candidates also clashed on abortion, which became a top issue in 2022 after the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, triggering several abortion bans in states across the country. In New Hampshire, Gov. Chris Sununu earlier signed a ban on abortions after 24 weeks into law.

The court decision left abortion laws up to individual states, a position that Leavitt said she supports. She was asked in the debate whether additional restrictions on abortion would put women’s lives at risk, with panelist Jean Mackin citing a peer-reviewed study that showed that a nationwide ban on abortion would lead to a 7% increase in pregnancy-related deaths the first year and a 21% increase thereafter.

Leavitt refused to answer the question, instead saying that she doesn’t favor a federal ban on abortion and supports current New Hampshire law. Asked the question again, she restated her previous statements.

Pappas was asked whether he supported a Department of Defense policy to pay for transportation costs for service members who needed to travel to another state for an elective abortion, and whether he supports expanding that to other government workers.

Pappas said he supports giving servicemembers and veterans access to the health care that they need before pivoting to attack Leavitt’s position.

“She supported the overturning of Roe v. Wade and said she would always be a pro-life vote in Congress. The folks in this state, the women of this state, deserve a pro-choice vote in Congress. That’s what I’ll be,” Pappas said. “Karoline Leavitt wants politicians to decide this issue for women. I want women and families in consultation with their doctors to decide it for themselves.”

Leavitt replied that the issue of abortion in New Hampshire should be decided by New Hampshire lawmakers.

“I support those closest to the people, closest to the voters in Concord, New Hampshire, to make decisions not just on this issue but, frankly, on every issue,” she said.

Pappas then reiterated that he believes abortion decisions should be left to women and their doctors.

“I think it’s really chilling that you stand up here tonight and you think that politicians in Concord should be determining this choice for women,” he said.

Both candidates dodged a question related to gun rights, when Leavitt was asked whether weapons like AR-15s are needed to prevent government tyranny and Pappas was asked whether the purpose of the Second Amendment was to give Americans the right to defend themselves from the government.

Neither addressed the specific question, but Leavitt said she supports the right of law-abiding citizens to buy guns. Pappas said people’s constitutional rights must be respected, but more must be done to address gun violence.

Leavitt didn’t answer directly when asked whether she believes former President Donald Trump is telling the truth when says the 2020 election was stolen from him.

“I have been very clear on my position on this issue,” Leavitt said. “I believe there were irregularities in the 2020 election. l talk to voters every single day who feel the same.”

Pappas said Leavitt has continued to spread falsehoods about the 2020 election, none of which are supported by evidence.

“She actually said she was proud to have ‘held the line’ on Jan. 6 by working for a member of Congress who voted to overturn the election results that night,” Pappas said. “That is just chilling. We know the folks who were holding the line that day, members of the Capitol police, five of whom lost their lives as a result of the insurrection at the Capitol because of the big lie, and you continue to tell it in your campaign, and that’s just shameful.”

The final Granite State Debate of this political cycle will be held Friday night with the 2nd Congressional District candidates. The debates air each night at 8 p.m. live on WMUR-TV, WMUR.com and inside the WMUR app.


Like it? Share with your friends!

0
admin

0 Comments

Your email address will not be published.